early Spode Badge book

Page from an early Spode Badge book c.1830. Spode made thousands of services for customers who wanted their own coat of arms on their tablewares, and this book alone shows heraldic devices for, inter alia, the Emperor of Brazil, Magdalene College Cambridge, the East India Company, the Mercers’ Company, Countess Newbourgh and numerous army regiments.

This page shows the devices Spode painted on services for the King of Persia, the Goldsmiths Company in the City of London and an unidentified customer. Also shown below for comparison, is a plate c.1830 in the Museum’s collection from the Goldsmiths Company service.

This page shows the devices Spode painted on services for the King of Persia

THE SPODE COLLECTION

Other Archive Material

This collection includes some 250,000 manuscripts, letters, invoices, and tools relating not only to Spode but also to various other aspects of ceramic making in Staffordshire. There are many photographs dating back to the end of the nineteenth century and film footage throughout the twentieth of people and processes at the factory. Many factory workers, now long dead, can be named, and their descendents traced.

The Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala written by James Bateman

The Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala written by James Bateman; published by J. Ridgway and Sons, London (1837 —1843) One of only 125 copies and now fully conserved.

A receipt dated 19th December 1798

A receipt dated 19th December 1798 for two quarters tax due at Michaelmas
paid by Josiah Spode as follows: House and Windows £7-1s-0d; Inhabited House £3-2s-6d; Dogs 9/- and Stamp 2d. Total £10-12s-8d.

wooden trunk inscribed “Copeland & Garrett Stoke upon Trent”

A curiosity dating from the 1830s – a wooden trunk inscribed “Copeland & Garrett Stoke upon Trent” before it was vandalised, probably around 1847.

Thomas Garrett was for 14 years a partner of William Taylor Copeland’s and wares manufactured between 1833 and 1847 bore the “Copeland and Garrett” mark.

Very little is known about him and he seems to have made little mark on the company. The vehemence with which his name has been obliterated might be suggestive.